From Left: Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Eleanor Heartney and Helaine Posner

From Left: Nancy Princenthal, Sue Scott, Eleanor Heartney and Helaine Posner

Author Bios

Eleanor Heartney is a Contributing Editor to Art in America and Artpress and has written extensively on contemporary art issues for such other publications as Artnews, Art and Auction, The New Art Examiner, the Washington Post and the New York Times. She received the College Art Association’s Frank Jewett Mather Award for distinction in art criticism in 1992. Her books include: Critical Condition: American Culture at the Crossroads 1997, Postmodernism 2001 Postmodern Heretics: The Catholic Imagination in Contemporary Art 2004, Defending Complexity: Art, Politics and the New World Order, 2006 and Art and Today, 2008. She is the co-author of the award winning book After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art published (Prestel, 2007) and of The Reckoning: Women Artists of the New Millennium released by Prestel in 2013. Heartney is a past President of AICA-USA, the American section of the International Art Critics Association. In 2008 she was honored by the French government as a Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. 

Helaine Posner is Senior Curator at the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, State University of New York.  Her exhibitions at the Neuberger Museum include Dana Schutz: If the Face Had Wheels accompanied by a monograph (Prestel, 2011) and Tania Bruguera: On the Political Imaginary.  From 1991-1998, she was curator at the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA where she curated exhibitions of contemporary art and wrote the accompanying catalogues. Posner is the author of a monograph on artist Kiki Smith (Monacelli, 2005) and was U.S. Co-commissioner for the 48th Venice Biennale where she organized Ann Hamilton: Myein.  She is the co-author of the award winning book After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art published (Prestel, 2007) and of The Reckoning: Women Artists of the New Millennium released by Prestel in 2013. Posner was curator of a mid-career survey of the work of Lorna Simpson which traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Miami Art Museum, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. 

Nancy Princenthal is a New York-based critic and former Senior Editor of Art in America, for which she continues to write regularly; she has also contributed to Art NewsArtforumParkett, the Village Voice, and the New York Times. Her monograph on Hannah Wilke was published by Prestel in 2010; her essays have also appeared in monographs on Michelle Stuart, Shirin Neshat, Doris Salcedo, Robert Mangold and Alfredo Jaar, among others. At present Princenthal is writing a book about Agnes Martin. Having taught at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College; Princeton University; Yale University, RISD, Montclair State University and elsewhere, she is currently on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts. She is the co-author of the award winning book After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art published (Prestel, 2007) and of The Reckoning: Women Artists of the New Millennium released by Prestel in 2013.

Sue Scott is an independent curator and writer living in New York.  She was Adjunct Curator of Contemporary Art at the Orlando Museum of Art for nineteen years, where she curated solo exhibitions of the works of Bryan Hunt, Jane Hammond, Suzanne McClelland, Katherine Bowling, Frank Moore, Kerry James Marshall, Jennifer Bartlett and Alex Katz, among others. Group exhibitions include Proof Positive: Forty Years of Printmaking at ULAE at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Witness Theories of Seduction for Dorsky Curatorial Programs, and The Washington Color School:  The First Generation and The Edward R. Broida Collection: A Selection of Works for the Orlando Museum of Art.  She is the co-author of the award-winning book After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed Contemporary Art (Prestel,2007), and of The Reckoning: Women Artists of the New Millennium released by Prestel in 2013.